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Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures
Rutgers University
Armitage Hall, 311 N. 5th Street
Camden, NJ 08102
(856) 225-6136
forlangs@camden.rutgers.edu

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Course Descriptions

Foreign Languages

50:415:489 Epic in Text and Image 

Introduces students to some of the greatest epics of the Western tradition – The Iliad, The Odyssey, The Aeneid, Parzival, The Divine Comedy, and others – but also moves beyond the reading and discussion of the texts themselves to study responses to these classic stories in ancient and medieval visual arts.  By combining the reading of the texts with the study of related images and discussion of oral storytelling traditions that lie behind the epic texts, the course attempts to place the classic texts in the context of the evolution of storytelling, the history of the book, the history of storytelling, and the history of narrative media.

 

French

50:420:101 all sections Elementary French I

Lays a foundation for speaking, understanding, reading, and writing the language. Lab attendance required. For students with no knowledge of French or with no more than two years of high school French. Entering students with previous French study will be placed according to theresults of a proficiency exam. Students with three or more years of French in high school may not take 50:420:101 for credit. For more information on the foreign language requirement and placement testing, go here.

50:420:131 Intermediate French I

Completes the study of basic French grammar. Provides an introduction to reading short prose texts, with practice in speaking and writing. Prerequisite: 50:420:102 or 109 or equivalent; or sufficient score on proficiency examination. Lab attendance required.

 

For updated Spring 2014 course listings, please click here.


German

50:470:101 all sections  Elementary German I

Training in pronunciation, grammar, composition, conversation, and in the reading of simple texts. Lab attendance required. For students with no knowledge of German or with usually no more than two years of high school German. Entering students with previous German study will be placed according to the results of a proficiency exam. Students with three or more years of German in high school may not take 50:470:101 for credit. For more information on the foreign language requirement and placement testing, go here.

 

50:470:131 Intermediate German I

Practice in writing and speaking German, a review of grammar, and a study of significant texts. Prerequisite: 50:470:102 or equivalent or sufficient score on proficiency examination. For more information on the foreign language requirement and placement testing, go here.

 

50:470:132 Intermediate German II

Continuation of 50:470:131. Prerequisite: 50:470:131 or equivalent or sufficient score on proficiency examination. 

 

50:470:203,204 Verbal Skills in Everyday Situations I, II 

Practice speaking and understanding spoken German in everyday situations. Level and materials will be adapted to individual needs. Can be taken concurrently with Intermediate German or by more advanced students for additional practice with the spoken language. Prerequisite: 50:470:102 or permission of instructor.

 

470:301:01  Advanced Grammar

A comprehensive review of German grammar, including “advanced” elements that may have been learned incompletely or not at all in earlier courses. Intensive instruction and practice with communicating in written German, including such important writing tasks as telling the story of a life, applying for a job, describing something you have seen or someone who know, making an argument, and writing a report.


 

Spanish

940:101 all sections Elementary Spanish I

Training designed to lay a foundation for speaking, writing, reading, and understanding the language.

Two hours of language lab work per week required.

For students with no knowledge of Spanish or with no more than two years of high school Spanish. Entering students with previous Spanish study will be placed according to the results of a proficiency exam. Students with three or more years of Spanish in high school may not take 50:940:101 for credit. For more information on the foreign language requirement and placement testing, go here.

940:102 all sections Elementary Spanish II

Continuation of 50:940:101. Prerequisite: 50:940:101 or equivalent. Two hours of language lab work per week required.

For students with little knowledge of Spanish or with no more than three years of high school Spanish. Entering students will be placed according to the results of a proficiency exam. Students with four or more years of Spanish in high school may not take 50:940:102 for credit. Note that 50:940:102 is the minimum level for fulfilling the college general degree requirement in foreign languages. For more information on the foreign language requirement and placement testing, go here.

940:121 all sections Intermediate Spanish I

Oral and written practice, emphasizing grammar review, and reading of selected materials.

Prerequisite: 50:940:102 or 104 or equivalent, or sufficient score on proficiency examination. Lab attendance required. For more information on the foreign language requirement and placement testing, go here.

940:122 all sections Intermediate Spanish II

Continuation of 50:940:121. Grammar review with reading and oral practice. Spanish 122 is a prerequisite for courses at the 200 level. Prerequisite: 50:940:121 or equivalen, or sufficient score on proficiency examinationt. Laboratory attendance required. For more information on the foreign language requirement and placement testing, go here

940:392 Special Topic: Imagining Children in Latin America

This course focuses on Latin American texts written for children, especially that of late 19th and 20th-century in Brazil, Mexico, the Southern Cone, the Caribbean, and U.S. Latino. Children have played a central role in the Latin American imagination for centuries: they have been subjected to adult discipline and norms, and they have been worshipped, as objects of family affection and religious devotion. How have changing social attitudes impacted the lived experiences of children across genders, races, class positions and national origins? By studying the interdisciplinary representation of childhood in short stories, poems, drama and visual arts, we will try to experience the lives of Latin American children, and to intervene in the socio-cultural and historical debates surrounding each text and cultural context.