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Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures
Rutgers University
Armitage Hall, 311 N. 5th Street
Camden, NJ 08102
(856) 225-6136
forlangs@camden.rutgers.edu

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Home » French » French Courses

French Courses

 

Learning Objectives

Introductory Language Sequence 

Through our Introductory Language Sequence, students will develop the ability to: 

- express basic linguistic and intercultural proficiency
- engage in everyday conversation with native speakers of French
- explore the underlying values involved in cross-cultural exchanges
- analyze authentic documents from French-speaking societies
- produce texts and media in French  

 

Intermediate to Advanced Language Sequence  

Through our Intermediate to Advanced Language Sequence, students will develop the ability to :

- express a comprehensive understanding of linguistic and cultural practices across the French-speaking world
- engage in sustained conversation with native speakers
- write university-level papers on academic topics in French
- identify and use language registers appropriate to context
- understand major cultural and political events in French-speaking environments
- analyze major literary, artistic and multimedia movements in French-speaking cultures
- become engaged global citizens who participate in the Francophone community of the Delaware Valley

Highly motivated students with a GPA of 3.7 or better in courses for their major may also carry out an individual project based on research or community involvement in French.

 


 

Courses in the French Language

The following courses emphasize the development of linguistic skills, speaking, understanding, reading and writing French. Students with previous study of French should take a proficiency exam for placement at the proper level. These courses satisfy the general curricular requirement for foreign languages.

50: 420: 101. Elementary French I (R) (4)
Lab attendance required. For students with no knowledge of French or with no more than two years of high school French. Entering students with previous French study will be placed according to the results of a proficiency exam. Students with three or more years of French in high school may not take 101 for credit.
Lays a foundation for speaking, understanding, reading, and writing the language.

50: 420: 102. Elementary French II (R) (4)
Prerequisite: 50:420:101 or equivalent. Lab attendance required. For students with little knowledge of French or with no more than three years of high school French. Entering students will be placed according to the results of a proficiency exam. Students with more than three years of French in high school may not take 102 for credit. Note that 102 (109 for evening students) is the minimum level for fullfilling the college general degree requirement in foreign languages.
Continuation of 50:420:101.

50: 420: 108. Elementary French I (R) (3)
Lab attendance required. For students with no knowledge of French or with no more than two years of high school French. Entering students with previous French study will be placed according to the results of a proficiency exam. Students with three or more years of French in high school may not take 108 for credit. This course is only available at night.
Lays a foundation for speaking, understanding, reading, and writing the language.

50: 420: 109. Elementary French II (R) (3)
Prerequisite: 50:420:108 or equivalent. Lab attendance required. For students with little knowledge of French or with no more than three years of high school French. Entering students will be placed according to the results of a proficiency exam. Students with more than three years of French in high school may not take 109 for credit. Note that 109 (102 for day students) is the minimum level for fullfilling the college general degree requirement in foreign languages.
Continuation of 50:420:108.

50: 420: 131. Intermediate French I (R) (3)
Prerequisite: 50:420:102 or 50:420:109 or equivalent or sufficient score on proficiency examination. Completes the study of basic French grammar, provides an introduction to reading short prose texts, with oral practice and review.

50: 420: 132. Intermediate French II (R) (3)
Prerequisite: 50:420:131 or equivalent. Continuation of 50:420:131. Review of French grammar, further reading of French prose texts, with practice in speaking and writing.

50: 420: 203, 204. French Composition and Conversation I, II (3,3)
Prerequisite: 50:420:132 or equivalent.
Constant practice in speaking and writing, with stress on developing an adequate vocabulary and idiom in the discussion of subjects related to French society and culture.

50:420:321. Advanced Grammar and Stylistics (3)
Prerequisite: 50:420:204, or 50:420:202, or permission of instructor.
A study of advanced French grammar and continued practice in writing, with emphasis on analyzing style in representative French writers. Attention to diction, phonetics, and special problems, as required.

50:420:322. Advanced Composition and Conversation (3)
Prerequisite: 50:420:204, or 50:420:202, or permission of instructor.
Conversation and composition in French on cultural, historical, literary, social and other aspects of French civilization.

 


Courses in French Literatures and Civilizations

These courses are conducted in French and are open only to students with demonstrated ability in the French language. These courses satisfy the general curricular requirement of one term of a foreign language or literature, as well as that of Global Studies.

50:420:201,202. Modern French Readings I,II (G) (3,3)
Prerequisite: 50:420:132, 50:420:204, or equivalent.
Oral and written practice continued. Extended reading of medium-length works and excerpts from French writers of the 19th and 20th centuries, with discussion of their significance.

50:420:307. The French Film in French (G) (3)
Prerequisite:50:420:132, or 50:420:202, or 50:420:204, or equivalent.May be taken as part of a minor in film studies.
Study of major French films of the 20th century, with some emphasis on the historical and cultural background. Includes filmmakers from the post-war period, the New Wave, and the postmodern era.

50:420:336. The Modern French Novel (G) (3)
Prerequisite: 50:420:202, or 50:420:204, or equivalent.
Reading and discussion of major French novels of the 19th and 20th centuries, with some emphasis on the historical and cultural background. Includes such authors as Balzac, Gide, Colette, Sartre, and Camus.

50:420:342. The Modern French Drama (G) (3)
Prerequisite: 50:420:202, or 50:420:204 or equivalent.
Study of the French theater through reading and discussion of selected plays from the 19th century to the present time including authors such as Musset, Rostand, Sartre, Ionesco, and Genet.

50:420:353,354. Individual Study in French (G) (BA,BA) (1-3)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Independent study guided by a member of the faculty, intended to provide opportunity for advanced students to investigate areas not covered in the regular curriculum.

50:420:360. French Civilization (G) (3)
Prerequisite: 50:420:132 or equivalent when conducted in French. May be given in English; language announced during preregistration.
Historical study of the people and culture of France and an examination of French values and attitudes as seen in the literature, arts, politics of the country, and in France’s relationship to the rest of the world.

19th Century French Civilization (includes study in France)
Prerequisite: see instructor.
An introduction to French Civilization of the 19th Century, with an emphasis on several famous writers of the period: Balzac, Hugo, Flaubert, Zola and Maupassant. Students will become acquainted with the major literary and artistic movements in 19th Century France. At the end of the semester, students will have the opportunity to visit Paris and Normandy, where several of the writers lived and worked and where their works were set.

 

50: 420: 391, 392 French Studies: Special Topics (3,3)
The topic announced during preregistration treats a particular topic related to French/Francophone cultures or to a historical period.

50:420:421. Prelude to Revolution (G) (3)
Prerequisites: 50:420:202, or 204 or permission of instructor.
Reading of major works of the classical era and their relationship to political and cultural trends, including such authors as Corneille, Molière, Voltaire, and Rousseau. Additional focus on history, painting and architecture.

50:420:441. The Age of Machines (G) (3)
Prerequisites: 50:420:202, or 204 or permission of instructor.
Focus on major literary movements of the 19th century and their relationship to political and cultural trends. Study of selected works by such authors as Hugo, Sand, Balzac, Baudelaire, Flaubert and Zola. Additional focus on history, painting and architecture.

50:420:451. Changing Times (G) (3)
Prerequisites: 50:420:202, or 204 or permission of instructor.
Study of major works of the 20th century by such authors as Gide, Giraudoux, Sartre, Camus, Duras and others. Additional focus on history, painting and film.

50:420:495,496. Honors Program in French (G) (3,3)
Prerequisite: Permission of department chairperson.

 


Courses in English

The following courses are given in English translation; all readings, lectures, classes, assignments and tests are in English. These courses are open to all students, and they may be used to satisfy the general curricular requirements in Literature and Global Studies. Students must complete the English composition requirement before taking these courses. Students wanting to take these courses for credit toward a French major or minor must meet the conditions described above under Major and Minor Requirements.

50: 420: 240, 241. French Studies in English Translation: Special Topics (3, 3) The topic announced during preregistration treats a particular theme or genre in French literature.

50: 420: 243. Francophone Literature in English Translation (3)
This course may be taken as part of a major in African-American Studies.
A study of the Francophone literature of Africa, the Caribbean, and North America. Reading and discussion of selected works in prose, poetry, and drama by representative writers of French expression in English translation. Topics include Negritude, the place of Quebec in the French-speaking world, the treatment of African women in literature, the search for minority identity, and others.

 

50: 420: 244. Women in French Literature in English Translation (3)
This course may be taken as part of a minor in Women’s Studies.
A study of major French works by and/or about women, by such writers as Molière, Balzac, De Charrière, Colette and Duras.

50: 420: 245 Crime Fiction in French Literature in English Translation (3)
This course may be taken as part of a major in Criminal Justice.
Using short novels and films, the course looks at the way crime and justice have been represented in French literature from the eighteenth century until the present. Ideas covered will include the bandit as folk hero, the aristocratic lawbreaker, the criminal as victim of society and as monstrous genius, crimes of passion, police in literature, the genre of the detective novel, courtrooms, and images of policing in modern society. Reading includes works by authors such as Diderot, Balzac, Hugo, Mérimée, Mauriac, Simenon, Camus and others, and a selection of French films are shown.

50: 420: 305, 306 French Film in English Translation (3,3)
These courses may be taken as part of a minor in Film Studies.
Survey of the history of French cinema from its beginnings to the present day. Analysis and interpretation of selected film masterpieces by major French filmmakers.

50: 420: 360 French Civilization. (3)
May be given in French; language announced during preregistration.
Historical study of the people and culture of France and an examination of French values and attitudes as seen in the literature, arts, politics of the country, and in France’s relationship to the rest of the world.

50: 420: 391, 392 French Studies in English Translation: Special Topics (3,3) The topic announced during preregistration treats a particular topic related to French/Francophone culture or to a historical period.


Spring 2014 Courses 

Learning Abroad Program in French: 50:420:387
 
Quebec Today: Culture, Politics & Exchange (G)
Taught in English

More than merely a ‘cross’ between French and American cultures, Quebec has developed a unique identity across time, transforming from a rural and predominantly Catholic society into an international center for multicultural and multilingual diversity. This course aims to introduce students to contemporary Quebec society through the study of several central themes:

  • The History of New FranceOld M
  • Language & Politics
  • Sovereignty & Canadian Federalism
  • Natural Resources, Food & Agriculture
  • First Nations Policy Issues
  • Immigration History & Debates
  • Gender & LGBTQA Culture
  • Contemporary Digital Media & Performance Arts

The Learning Abroad Study Tour that will conclude this course will offer students an opportunity to visit the historical streets of Old City Quebec as well as the cosmopolitan city of Montreal. The last full day of the trip, June 24, 2014, falls on the Quebec National Holiday (la Fête Saint Jean Baptiste) with free concerts and events attended each year by thousands expressing their Quebec pride. Click here to preview the course syllabus: Learning-Abroad-Program-in-French-Quebec-Taught-in-English-Syllabus

 

Special Topics in French 50:420:391

Contemporary Quebec:  L’Exception Québécoise Since the Quiet Revolution
Taught in French
2013-08-20 16.06.34 - Copy

Our goal in this course is to explore l’exception québécoise, or the unique status of Quebec in North America and the field of Francophone Postcolonial Studies. We will examine social, cultural, and political debates in Quebec since the period of rapid change known as the Quiet Revolution, which transformed la belle province after World War II.

To analyze how class, gender, sexuality and national belonging have evolved in Quebec over the past 50 years, we will examine a variety of genres, from novels and poetry, to bande dessinée, essays, theater, and film. We will pay special attention to gender, sexuality, feminism, LGBTQ rights and youth culture today.

Our analyses will highlight the ways in which the multicultural and plurilingual identity of Quebec has been enriched by authors and directors from First Nations and immigrant backgrounds, as well as by the re-conception of pure laine (“pure wool”) identity since the referendums in 1980 and 1995. Click here to preview the course syllabus: Special Topics in French – Contemporary Quebec – Taught in French – Syllabus.

 


Fall 2013 Courses

50: 420: 392 Special Topics: Beauty and the Beholder: Francophone Art and Literature

This course will explore how aesthetics were re-conceptualized by major movements in 19th  and 20th century Francophone arts and literatures. It will focus on the reception of innovative art forms by various “beholders,” ranging from critics to the general public, who have defined and analyzed beauty in different ways over time.

Students will analyze various genres (drawing, painting, sculpture, architecture, film, installation art, etc.) by key figures in the artistic and literary fields (Hugo, Balzac, Rodin, Flaubert, Baudelaire, Léger, Picasso, Césaire, Sénac, Saint Phalle, Calle, etc.). How does the socio-historical context and subject position of the “beholder” influence his or her notions of beauty? How does art history and literary criticism broaden and deepen our understanding of aesthetics? Click here to preview the course syllabus : Beauty and the Beholder: Francophone Art and Literature.